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Archive for February, 2011

LOS ANGELES – She was the voluptuous pin-up girl who set a million male hearts to pounding during World War II, the favorite movie star of a generation of young men long before she’d made a movie more than a handful of them had ever seen.
Such was the stunning beauty of Jane Russell, and the marketing skills of the man who discovered her, the eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes.
Russell, surrounded by family members, died Monday at her home in the central coast city of Santa Maria. Her death from respiratory failure came 70 years after Hughes had put her on the path to stardom with his controversial Western “The Outlaw.” She was 89.
Although she had all but abandoned Hollywood after the 1960s for a quieter life, her daughter-in-law Etta Waterfield said Russell remained active until just a few weeks ago when her health began to fail. Until then she was active with her church, charities that were close to her heart and as a member of a singing group that made occasional appearances around Santa Maria.
“She always said I’m going to die in the saddle, I’m not going to sit at home and become an old woman,” Waterfield told The Associated Press on Monday. “And that’s exactly what she did, she died in the saddle.”
It was an apt metaphor for a stunningly beautiful woman who first made her mark as the scandalously sexy and provocatively dressed (for the time) pal of Billy the Kid, in a Western that Hughes fought for years with censors to get into wide release.
As the billionaire battled to bring the picture to audiences, his publicity mill promoted Russell relentlessly, grinding out photos of her in low-cut costumes, swimsuits and other outfits that became favorite pinups of World War II GIs.
To contain her ample bust the designer of the “Spruce Goose” airplane used his engineering skills to make Russell a special push-up bra (one she said she never wore). He also bought the ailing RKO film studio and signed her to a 20-year contract that paid her $1,000 a week.
By the time she made her third film, the rollicking comedy-western “The Paleface,” in which she played tough- but-sexy Calamity Jane to Bob Hope’s cowardly dentist sidekick, she was a star.
She went on to appear in a series of potboilers for RKO, including “His Kind of Woman” (with Robert Mitchum), “Double Dynamite” (Frank Sinatra, Groucho Marx), “The Las Vegas Story” (Victor Mature) and “Macao” (Mitchum again).
Although her sultry, sensual look and her hourglass figure made her the subject of numerous nightclub jokes, unlike Marilyn Monroe, Rita Hayworth and other pinup queens of the era, Russell was untouched by scandal in her personal life.
During her Hollywood career she was married to star UCLA and pro football quarterback Bob Waterfield.
“The Outlaw,” although it established her reputation, was beset with trouble from the beginning. It took two years to make, according to its theatrical trailer, and director Howard Hawks, one of Hollywood’s most eminent and autocratic filmmakers, became so rankled under producer Hughes’ constant suggestions that he walked out.
“Hughes directed the whole picture — for nine bloody months!” Russell said in 1999.
It had scattered brief runs beginning in 1943, earning scathing reviews. The Los Angeles Times called it “one of the weirdest Western pictures that ever unreeled before the public.”
Russell’s only other notable film was “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,” a 1953 musical based on the novel by Anita Loos that cast her opposite Monroe.
She followed that up with the 1954 musical “The French Line,” which — like “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” — had her cavorting on an ocean liner. The film was shot in 3-D, and the promotional campaign for it proclaimed “J.R. in 3D. Need we say more?”
In 1955, she made the sequel “Gentlemen Marry Brunettes” (without Monroe) and starred in the Westerns “The Tall Men,” with Clark Gable, and “Foxfire,” with Jeff Chandler. But by the 1960s, her film career had faded.
“Why did I quit movies?” she remarked in 1999. “Because I was getting too old! You couldn’t go on acting in those years if you were an actress over 30.”
She continued to appear in nightclubs, television and musical theater, including a stint on Broadway in Stephen Sondheim’s “Company.” She formed a singing group with Connie Haines and Beryl Davis, and they recorded gospel songs.
For many years she served as TV spokeswoman for Playtex bras, and in the 1980s she made a few guest appearances in the TV series “The Yellow Rose.”
She was born Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell on June 21, 1921, in Bemidji, Minn., and the family later moved to Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley. Her mother was a lay preacher, and she encouraged the family to build a chapel in their back yard.
Despite her mother’s Christian teachings, young Jane had a wild side. She wrote in her 1985 autobiography, “My Paths and Detours,” that during high school she had a back-alley abortion, which may have rendered her unable to bear children.
Her early ambition was to design clothes and houses, but that was postponed until her later years. While working as a receptionist, she was spotted by a movie agent who submitted her photos to Hughes.
The producer was famous for dating his discoveries, as well as numerous other Hollywood actresses, but his contact with Russell remained strictly business. Her engagement and 1943 marriage to Waterfield assured that.
She was the leader of the Hollywood Christian Group, a cluster of film people who gathered for Bible study and good works. After experiencing problems in adopting her three children, she founded World Adoption International Agency, which has helped facilitate adoptions of more than 40,000 children from overseas.
She made hundreds of appearances for WAIF and served on the board for 40 years.
As she related in “My Path and Detours,” her life was marked by heartache. Her 24-year marriage to Waterfield ended in bitter divorce in 1968. They had adopted two boys and a girl.
That year she married actor Roger Barrett; three months later he died of a heart attack. In 1978 she married developer John Peoples, and they lived in Sedona, Ariz., and later, Santa Barbara. He died in 1999 of heart failure.
Over the years Russell was also beset by alcoholism.
Always she was able to rebound from troubles by relying on lessons she learned from her Bible-preaching mother.
“Without faith, I never would have made it,” she commented a few months after her third husband’s death. “I don’t know how people can survive all the disasters in their lives if they don’t have any faith, if they don’t know the Lord loves them and cares about them and has another plan.”
Survivors include her children, Thomas K. Waterfield, Tracy Foundas and Robert “Buck” Waterfield, six grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.
A public funeral is scheduled March 12 at 11 a.m. at Pacific Christian Church in Santa Maria.
In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations be made in her name to either the Care Net Pregnancy and Resource Center of Santa Maria or the Court Appointed Special Advocates of Santa Barbara County.

http://oscars.movies.yahoo.com/news/2650-jane-russell-star-of-40s-and-50s-films-dies-ap

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MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – He didn’t seek the spotlight, but when Frank Buckles outlived every other American who’d served in World War I, he became what his biographer called “the humble patriot” and final torchbearer for the memory of that fading conflict.

Buckles enlisted in World War I at 16 after lying about his age. He died Sunday on his farm in Charles Town, nearly a month after his 110th birthday. He had devoted the last years of his life to campaigning for greater recognition for his former comrades, prodding politicians to support a national memorial in Washington and working with friend and family spokesman David DeJonge on a biography.

“We were always asking ourselves: How can we represent this story to the world?” DeJonge said Monday. “How can we make sure World War I isn’t forgotten.”

Buckles asked his daughter, Susannah Flanagan, about progress toward a national memorial every week, sometimes daily.

“He was sad it’s not completed,” DeJonge said. “It’s a simple straightforward thing to do, to honor Americans.”

When asked in February 2008 how it felt to be the last survivor, Buckles said simply, “I realized that somebody had to be, and it was me.”

Only two known veterans remain, according to the Order of the First World War, a Florida group whose members are descendants of WWI veterans and include Buckles’ daughter. The survivors are Florence Green in Britain and Claude Choules in Australia, said Robert Carroon, the group’s senior vice commander. Choules, who served in Britain’s Royal Navy, was born in that country but now lives in Australia.

Green turned 110 on Feb. 19, and Choules turns 110 in March, he said.

Born in Missouri in 1901 and raised in Oklahoma, Buckles visited a string of military recruiters after the United States in April 1917 entered what was called “the war to end all wars.” He was repeatedly rejected before convincing an Army captain he was 18.

More than 4.7 million people joined the U.S. military from 1917-18. By 2007, only three survived. Buckles went to Washington that year to serve as grand marshal of the national Memorial Day parade.

Unlike Buckles, the other two survivors were still in basic training in the United States when the war ended, and they did not make it overseas. When they died in late 2007 and 2008, Buckles became the last so-called doughboy — and a soft-spoken celebrity.

He got fan mail almost every day, DeJonge said, and had enough birthday cards to fill several bushel baskets.

DeJonge had visited Buckles late last week and was driving back to Michigan with about 5,000 letters to organize and answer when he got the call telling him his friend had died.

“The letters are so heartfelt,” he said. “Each night, Susannah would go in and sit at Papa’s bedside and read them to Frank. That kept him going.”

Buckles had been battling colds and other minor ailments this winter, but he was not ill at the time of his death.

The day before he died was warm, DeJonge said, and he spent three hours sitting in the sunshine on the porch of his farmhouse, talking with his daughter.

She worked diligently to keep Buckles in his own home, even though it exhausted his life savings. DeJonge said home health nurses and other medical care cost about $120,000 a year.

Details for services and arrangements will be announced later this week, but the family is planning a burial in Arlington National Cemetery. In 2008, friends persuaded the federal government to make an exception to its rules for who can be interred there.

Buckles had already been eligible to have his cremated remains housed at the cemetery. Burial, however, normally requires meeting several criteria, including earning one of five medals, such as a Purple Heart.

Buckles never saw combat but once joked, “Didn’t I make every effort?”

U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito and the rest of West Virginia’s congressional delegation were also working Monday on a plan to allow Buckles to lie in repose in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol.

According to the Architect of the Capitol’s website, the last person to do so was President Gerald Ford.

The honor is reserved mostly for elected and military officials, but others have included civil rights activist Rosa Parks and unknown soldiers from both World Wars and the Korean War.

Sen. Jay Rockefeller called Buckles “a wonderfully plainspoken man and an icon for the World War I generation” and said he will continue fighting for the memorial Buckles wanted.

“He lived a long and rich life as a true American patriot,” said Sen. Joe Manchin, “and I hope that his family’s loss is lightened with the knowledge that he was loved and will be missed by so many.”

The family asked that donations be made to the National World War One Legacy Project. The project is managed by the nonprofit Survivor Quest and will educate students about Buckles and WWI through a documentary and traveling educational exhibition.

“We have lost a living link to an important era in our nation’s history,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki. “But we have also lost a man of quiet dignity, who dedicated his final years to ensuring the sacrifices of his fellow ‘Doughboys’ are appropriately commemorated.”

In spring 2007, Buckles told The Associated Press of the trouble he went through to get into the military.

“I went to the state fair up in Wichita, Kansas, and while there, went to the recruiting station for the Marine Corps,” he said. “The nice Marine sergeant said I was too young when I gave my age as 18, said I had to be 21.”

Buckles returned a week later.

“I went back to the recruiting sergeant, and this time I was 21,” he said with a grin. “I passed the inspection … but he told me I just wasn’t heavy enough.”

Then he tried the Navy, whose recruiter told Buckles he was flat-footed.

Buckles wouldn’t quit. In Oklahoma City, an Army captain demanded a birth certificate.

“I told him birth certificates were not made in Missouri when I was born, that the record was in a family Bible. I said, ‘You don’t want me to bring the family Bible down, do you?'” Buckles said with a laugh. “He said, ‘OK, we’ll take you.'”

Buckles served in England and France, working mainly as a driver and a warehouse clerk. An eager student of culture and language, he used his off-duty hours to learn German, visit cathedrals, museums and tombs, and bicycle in the French countryside.

After Armistice Day, Buckles helped return prisoners of war to Germany. He returned to the United States in January 1920.

After the war, he returned to Oklahoma, then moved to Canada, where he worked a series of jobs before heading for New York City. There, he landed jobs in banking and advertising.

But it was the shipping industry that suited him best, and he worked around the world for the White Star Line Steamship Co. and W.R. Grace & Co.

In 1941, while on business in the Philippines, Buckles was captured by the Japanese. He spent more than three years in prison camps.

“I was never actually looking for adventure,” he once said. “It just came to me.”

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110228/ap_on_re_us/us_obit_last_wwi_veteran

 

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Charlie Sheen Demands $3 Million Per Episode

An arrogant and unapologetic Charlie Sheencontinued his rants on the “Today” show this morning, delivering a of slew of one-liners aimed at CBS, “Two and a Half Men” creator Chuck Lorre and all the “fools” who dare defy him.

“They owe me a big one. Publicly,” Sheen said, demanding an apology from CBS for shutting down the sitcom after his crazy tirade.

“To have people think I’m insane or they don’t think that what I’m saying is true? I have no interest in their tarred opinions. I really don’t,” he added. “I’m gonna live my life the way they want. They can just find the most comfortable chair in their small house and sit back and enjoy the show.”

The filthy-rich star is demanding a $3 million per episode, a full million more than he says he makes for each episode now: a total of $2 million with back-end profit participation. (His straight per-episode rate is $1.2 million.)

By any estimation, Sheen is already thehighest-paid actor on TV. Why does he say he deserves more? “Look what they put me through,” he said, likely referring to CBS shutting down the show in the wake of his recent off-color remarks and insults to the show’s producers.

Quoth Sheen: “I’m tired of pretending I’m not special.” As for those who believe he should get help, he snipes: “Fools. Trolls. Weak. Defeated.”

He declared that he would do a 10th season of the CBS sitcom — but he’s not about to beg for his job back. It should be the other way around, he argued, invoking his past showbiz credits onIMDB.com.

“Right there: 62 movies and a ton of success,” he boasted. “Come on, bro. I won ‘Best Picture’ at 20. Wasn’t even trying. Wasn’t even warm.”

The “Today” appearance is just one of two big TV interviews Sheen has given in recent days: he opened his home to ABC News this weekend for a special one-hour episode of “20/20” that will air on Tuesday night.

He told them he plans to get CBS to make good on his monetary demands, even if it meansa trip to court.

“I’m here to collect. They’re gonna lose. They’re gonna lose in a courtroom. So, I would recommend that they do an out of court settlement and fix this whole thing, and pay the crew, and get season nine back on board,” he said.

Sheen, who passed a drug test over the weekend given by Radar Online, and another administered by “20/20,” insists he’s not an addict and that he is currently clean.

When “Today” interviewer Jeff Rossen asked whether he’d relapse into further substance abuse, Sheen responded: “I’m fine. Sometimes I overshoot the mark. But whatever…I just won’t do it. I will not believe that if I do something, then I have to follow a certain path because it was written for normal people. People that aren’t special. People that don’t have tiger blood or Adonis DNA.”

Sheen also addressed criticism that his remarks toward Lorre — whom he’d referred to as “Chaim Levine” in a seemingly delusional open letter to TMZ — were anti-Semitic. “I’m not an anti-Semite,” he said. “My manager is Mark Burg. My interviewer is Jeff Rossen.”

http://omg.yahoo.com/blogs/thefamous/charlie-sheen-demands-3-million-per-episode/739?nc

 

 

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Worst Cities for Finding a Job in 2011

Of course Miami is on the damn list since we suck balls man.

****

If you’ve exhausted all other options, relocating can be a smart move for improving your job prospects–but be sure to check where people are hiring, and in what industries before you pack your bags and go.

The scrumptious Cajun cuisine and sweet jazz of New Orleans may make that city seem the perfect place for a fresh start–but the Big Easy is right now the toughest city in the U.S. for finding employment, according to the online job aggregator Indeed.com.

In Pictures: The Hardest Cities for Finding a JobIn Pictures: The Hardest Cities for Finding a Job

“New Orleans never fully recovered from the Katrina disaster, and tourism hasn’t bounced back,” says Paul Forster, Indeed.com’s chief executive officer and cofounder. “But I think we’ll see some improvement over the next year.”

Indeed.com compiled a list of America’s easiest and hardest cities for finding a job using data collected from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The ranking was determined by calculating the number of job postings per thousand people in each major U.S. metropolitan area. The data covers job listings in the fourth quarter of 2010 with salary estimates of $50,000 or more.

The picture this offers does not reflect a precise number of available jobs. An opening can be listed in more than one place and can remain online for a time after it’s filled. Nevertheless, the numbers do present a strong, broad gauge of which cities are the easiest and hardest for finding a job.

Historically, the easiest cities for finding a job thrive on industries that benefit from shifts in the economy or trends, says Forster. And the hardest cities rely on industries that suffer most during economic downturns. The rankings of the easiest and hardest cities for finding jobs confirm his view.

The results show that life is not a beach for job seekers in Miami. The cruise capital may have good air quality, clean drinking water and vast green spaces, but it doesn’t have many openings. According to Indeed.com, Miami had 14 listings for high-paying jobs, per 1,000 residents, over the whole fourth quarter of 2010.

Your chances of finding a job in a colder place like Buffalo or Rochester, N.Y., are just as dim. There were merely 11 job postings for every 1,000 people in those metro areas, which tied for the second hardest place for finding a job.

Don’t lose all hope, though. There are plenty of cities with thousands of high-paying jobs. San JoseSan Francisco and Seattle are three of the top five easiest cities for finding a job.

Located in the heart of Silicon Valley, San Jose ranks No. 1–but tech geeks are the ones most likely to find employment there with ease.

The area around the city that has dubbed itself “the capital of Silicon Valley” is home to the headquarters of major corporations such as Adobe Systems, Cisco Systems and eBay, as well as esteemed universities like Stanford and the University of California, Berkeley, which are notorious for pumping thousands of computer science and engineering graduates into the local job market each year.

“The established tech companies and emerging tech companies are both aggressively searching for talent,” Forster says. “They look for experienced professionals as well as recent college graduates.”

There were approximately 126 listings for high-paying jobs per 1,000 residents in the San Jose metro area for the three months that ended Dec. 31, 2010–but don’t give up if your job search has been fruitless even in the easiest city for finding a job. In the No. 2 and No. 3 spots on the list,Washington and Baltimore also saw heavy recruiting throughout the last quarter of 2010. The federal government remains a top hiring source in D.C., where there were 116 high-paying job postings per 1,000 people last quarter. Baltimore, which is home to major research institutions and defense-related contractors, has particularly many job opportunities for health care and information technology professionals.

Forster says that after a significant decline in online job postings in 2009, and a sizable increase last year, he expects to see growth again in 2011.

America’s Five Hardest Cities to Find Jobs

No. 5 (tie): Riverside, Ca.
16 job postings per 1,000 population between October and December 2010.

 

Hardest Cities to Find Jobs
No. 5 (tie): Riverside, Ca.
Photo: David Liu/iStockphoto

 

No. 5 (tie): Louisville, Ky.
16 job postings per 1,000 population between October and December 2010.

 

Hardest Cities to Find Jobs
No. 5 Louisville, Ky.
Photo: Thinkstock

 

No. 4: Miami, Fla.
14 job postings per 1,000 population between October and December 2010.

 

Hardest Cities to Find Jobs
No. 4 Miami, Fla.
Photo: Thinkstock

 

No. 2 (tie): Rochester, N.Y.
11 job postings per 1,000 population between October and December 2010.

 

Hardest Cities to Find Jobs
No. 2 (tie) Rochester, N.Y.
Photo: Dean Lyettefi/iStockphoto

 

No. 2 (tie): Buffalo, N.Y.
11 job postings per 1,000 population between October and December 2010.

 

Hardest Cities to Find Jobs
No. 2 (tie) Buffalo, N.Y.
Photo: Denis Tangney Jr./iStockphoto

 

No. 1: New Orleans, La.
10 job postings per 1,000 population between October and December 2010.

 

Hardest Cities to Find Jobs
No. 1 New Orleans, La.



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Keep Calm

This episode of Supernatural was too damn well as always awesome man.


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Great Read

As is Naked Heat almost done with it.

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Who Owns the U.S.?

Regardless of how much closer Obama’s budget brings our economy into a balance of payments not seen since 2001, we will continue to run deficits for the next decade, and the national debt will keep growing every year that happens

While most of the country’s $14 trillion debt is held by private banks in the U.S., the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve Board estimate that, as of December, about $4.4 trillion of it was held by foreign governments that purchase our treasury securities much as an investor buys shares in a company and comes to own his or her little chunk of the organization.

Looking at the list of our top international creditors, a few overall characteristics show some interesting trends: Three of the top 10 spots are held by China and its constituent parts, and while two of our biggest creditors are fellow English-speaking democracies, a considerable share of our debt is held by oil exporters that tend to be decidedly less friendly in other areas of international relations.

Here we break down the top 10 foreign holders of U.S. debt, comparing each creditor’s holdings with the equivalent chunk of the United States they “own,” represented by the latest (2009) state gross domestic product data released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Obviously, these creditors won’t actually take states from us as payment on our debts, but it’s fun to imagine what states and national monuments they could assert a claim to.

 

foreigndebt-flags.jpg
©Radar Communication

 

1. Mainland China

Amount of U.S. debt: $891.6 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 20.4%

Building on the holdings of its associated territories, China is the undisputed largest holder of U.S. foreign debt in the world. Accounting for 20.4% of the total, mainland China’s $891.6 billion in U.S. treasury securities is almost equal to the combined 2009 GDP of Illinois ($630.4 billion) and Indiana ($262.6 billion) in 2009, a shade higher at a combined $893 billion. As President Obama — who is from Chicago — wrangles over his proposed budget with Congress he may be wise to remember that his home city may be at stake in the deal.

2. Japan

Amount of U.S. debt: $883.6 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 20.2%

The runner-up on the list of our most significant international creditors goes to Japan, which accounts for over a fifth of our foreign debt holdings with $883.6 billion in U.S. treasury securities. That astronomical number is just shy of the combined GDP of a significant chunk of the lower 48: Minnesota ($260.7 billion), Wisconsin ($244.4 billion), Iowa ($142.3 billion) and Missouri ($239.8 billion) produced a combined output of $887.2 billion in 2009.

3. United Kingdom

Amount of U.S. debt: $541.3 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 12.4%

At number three on the list is perhaps our closest ally on the world stage, the United Kingdom (which includes the British provinces of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, as well as the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man). The U.K. holds $541.3 billion in U.S. foreign debt, which is 12.4% of our total external debt. That amount is equivalent to the combined GDP of two East Coast manufacturing hubs, Delaware ($60.6 billion) and New Jersey ($483 billion) — which was named, yes, after the island of Jersey in the English Channel. The two states’ combined output in 2009 came to $543.6 billion.

[World’s Most Innovative Companies]

4. Oil Exporters

Amount of U.S. debt: $218 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 5%

Another grouped entry, the oil exporters form another international bloc with money to burn. The group includes 15 countries as diverse as the regions they represent: Ecuador, Venezuela, Indonesia, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Gabon, Libya, and Nigeria. As a group they hold 5% of all American foreign debt, with a combined $218 billion of U.S. treasury securities in their own treasuries. That’s roughly equivalent to the combined 2009 GDP of Nebraska ($86.4 billion) and Kansas ($124.9 billion), which seems to be an equal trade: The two states produce a bunch of grain for export, which many of the arid oil producers tend to trade for oil.

 

foreigndebt-brazil.jpg
©MS Illustration/Public Domain

 

5. Brazil

Amount of U.S. debt: $180.8 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 4.1%

Rounding out the top five is the largest economy in South America, Brazil. The country known for its beaches, Carnaval and the unbridled hedonism that goes along with both has made a big investment in the U.S., buying up $180.8 billion in American debt up to December. That’s almost equal to the $180.5 billion combined GDP of Idaho ($54 billion) and Nevada ($126.5 billion), a state that is no stranger to hedonism itself.

6. Caribbean Banking Centers

Amount of U.S. debt: $155.6 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 3.6%

You have to have cash on hand to buy up U.S. government debt, and offshore banking has given six countries the combined capital needed to make the Caribbean Banking Centers our sixth-largest foreign creditor. The Treasury Department counts the Bahamas, Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the Netherlands Antilles, Panama and the British Virgin Islands in this designation, which as a group holds $155.6 billion in U.S. treasury securities. That’s equivalent to the GDP of landlocked Kentucky ($156.6 billion), whose residents may not actually mind if they were ever to become an extension of some Caribbean island paradise.

[The Top Franchises For the Money]

7. Hong Kong

Amount of U.S. debt: $138.2 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 3.2%

At No. 7 on the list of our foreign creditors is Hong Kong, a formerly British part of China that maintains a separate government and economic ties than the communist mainland. With $138.2 billion in U.S. treasury securities, the capitalist enclave could lay claim to Yellowstone Park and our nation’s capital: The combined GDP of Wyoming ($37.5 billion) and Washington D.C. ($99.1 billion) totaled $136.6 billion in 2009.

 

foreigndebt-canada.jpg
©MS Illustration/Public Domain

 

8. Canada

Amount of U.S. debt: $134.6 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 3.1%

They say that a friend in need is a friend indeed, and our neighbor to the north has proven to be a kind and generous creditor in our time of financial need. Canada holds about 3.1% of our foreign debt, or $134.6 billion. If friend were to become enemy and Canada were looking to annex some U.S. land to cover the debt though, the country would have an easy time of it. The combined GDP of Maine ($51.3 billion), New Hampshire ($59.4 billion) and Vermont ($25.4 billion) comes close to Canada’s debt holdings at $136.1 billion.

Residents of the three states in our extreme northeast corner should start practicing their French: They might become Québécois one of these days.

9. Taiwan

Amount of U.S. debt: $131.9 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 3.0%

Taiwan, an island barely 100 miles off the coast of China, is claimed by the People’s Republic of China, despite having its own government and economic relations with the outside world. Part of those economic relations includes the island’s holding of $131.9 billion of U.S. debt, roughly equivalent to the combined GDP of West Virginia ($63.3 billion) and Hawaii ($66.4 billion), which totals $129.7 billion.

Unless we get our spending in check, we risk losing some of our most visually stunning territory (West Virginia, obviously) to our friendly neighbors on the other side of the Pacific Ocean.

10. Russia

Amount of U.S. debt: $106.2 billion

Share of total foreign debt: 2.4%

Starting off the list of our major foreign creditors is Russia, which holds about 2.4% of the U.S. debt pie that sits on the international dinner table. Its $106.2 billion in treasury securities is equivalent to the 2009 GDP of our sparsely populated North: The combined output of North Dakota ($31.9 billion), South Dakota ($38.3 billion) and Montana ($36 billion) matches up nicely with the Russian holdings, at $106.2 billion.

Let’s hope Russian president Dmitry Medvedev doesn’t come to collect.

http://finance.yahoo.com/banking-budgeting/article/112189/who-owns-the-us?mod=bb-debtmanagement

 

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